Former Marine wanted in fatal shooting of Virginia man

A former Marine is wanted in the murder of his mother’s boyfriend.

Rodney Brown, 54, was shot and killed on Saturday just before noon at his home in Hardy, Virginia, about 9 miles southeast of Roanoke. The following day, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office named Michael Alexander Brown, the son of Rodney Brown’s live-in girlfriend, the suspect in his killing.

Michael Alexander Brown, 22, was serving as a combat engineer for the United States Marine Corps until around Oct. 18, when he deserted his post at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. He has been seen in and around Virginia’s Franklin County in the past two weeks, according to the sheriff’s office.

PHOTO: Michael Alexander Brown is seen in this undated handout photo.
Franklin County Sheriffs Office

Michael Alexander Brown is seen in this undated handout photo.

It’s unknown where the suspect may be headed or where he has been staying since leaving his post. But he has been known to live in the woods and visit national parks, according to the sheriff’s office.

Michael Alexander Brown “is believed to be armed with a high-powered rifle and may have access to other weapons.” Those who come in contact with him “should use extreme caution and contact law enforcement immediately,” the sheriff’s office said.

The suspect has recently been driving a 2008 black Lincoln Town Car, possibly with North Carolina tags, although there are no license plates registered in his name.

Anyone with information on the case or the suspect’s whereabouts is urged to contact J.P. Nolen with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office at 540-483-6662.

ABC News’ Ben Stein contributed to this report.

Armys new recruiting ads focus less on combat roles

The Army’s glitzy new recruiting campaign that kicked off on Veterans Day focuses less attention on combat roles and highlights lesser-known jobs like cyber warriors and scientists.

The ads are intended to “surprise” the 17-to-24-year-olds of “Generation Z” and raise awareness of less-popularized roles in the Army at a time when a strong economy is making it difficult to find new recruits.

The “What’s Your Warrior” campaign will still highlight combat roles, but it also plays up some of the service’s 150 career fields. It’s a main reason why the new pitch showcases cyber protection and scientists researching the Zika virus.

PHOTO: The Armys new recruiting campaign called Whats Your Warrior.
U.S. Army

The Army’s new recruiting campaign called “What’s Your Warrior.”

“The goal is to show the breadth and depth of roles that you can play in the United States Army and how these individual roles come together to form the most powerful team on earth,” said Brig. Gen. Alex Fink, head of the Army’s enterprise marketing. “You can be a warrior and work in cyberspace or in signals, or as a logistician.”

The ads are a big change from previous recruiting efforts “in terms of the use of colors, the use of music, the way we transition, the types of roles that we’re going to show and how we show those types of roles will be different,” Fink added. “We want to try to do it in a way that surprises our Generation Z audience.”

The Army’s stated recruiting goal for fiscal year 2020 is 69,000 new soldiers, but a stronger economy and a shrinking pool of candidates who meet educational, health and fitness requirements has hindered that effort.

PHOTO: The Armys new recruiting campaign called Whats Your Warrior.
U.S. Army

The Army’s new recruiting campaign called “What’s Your Warrior.”

In addition to putting the new ads on TV, Find said they’ll have a strong “digital marketing presence” so members of Gen-Z encounter them on social media.

“That’s part of how you reach them,” said Fink. “We’ve got to meet them where they are.”

PHOTO: Captain Erika Alvarado, who serves on an Army Reserve Cyber Protection Team is seen in the Armys new recruiting campaign Whats Your Warrior
U.S. Army

Captain Erika Alvarado, who serves on an Army Reserve Cyber Protection Team is seen in the Army’s new recruiting campaign “What’s Your Warrior”

One of the five soldiers highlighted in the ad campaign is Captain Erika Alvarado, 34, an Army Reservist who leads a Cyber Protection Team.

Focusing on non-combat roles will get the attention of younger potential recruits, Alvarado said.

“It will definitely open their horizons and perspectives to know that it’s not just war and shooting and blowing things up,” Alvarado added. “We have professional careers, whether it be myself, like in cyber or the medical, or engineers.”

Alvarado initially joined the Reserves as an enlisted soldier when she was 17, needing a waiver from her mother so she could join before her 18th birthday.

She later became an officer and about a year ago transitioned from being a career logistician to the cyber realm.

“I would say no matter what passion an individual has, in any type of specialty, the Army has a position for them,” she said. “And every one of them is just as important as everyone else.”

The ad campaign is included in the Army’s proposed $335 million marketing budget for 2020, though the actual amounts to be spent this year will depend on pending congressional action.

Fink characterized the ad campaign as “the most complex and most integrated marketing campaign in the history, of the United States Army.”

Start Here: Whats ahead for public impeachment hearings

It’s Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. Let’s start here.

1. Impeachment goes public

The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump and his Ukraine call enters a new phase with public hearings for several key witnesses set for this week.

ABC News Senior National Correspondent Terry Moran previews what to expect on today’s “Start Here” podcast and the case that Democrats are making, “At the end of the day, it does come down to that phone call and what President Trump was doing, was he essentially demanding… or was he defending the interests of the nation when it comes to corruption in Ukraine?”

2. Billionaire Bloomberg

“You want to run for president? That’s fine, but don’t think you can simply buy an election by spending billions of dollars.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez sat down with ABC News’ Rachel Scott on the campaign trail, reacting to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg possibly entering the race and the impact of the impeachment probe.

PHOTO: ABC News Rachel Scott interviews with Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.
ABC News

ABC News’ Rachel Scott interviews with Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

3. ‘What’s Your Warrior’

This Veteran’s Day, the U.S. Army is adapting to a changing workforce by approaching recruiting in a new way and promoting a different kind of military service-member.

The new recruiting campaign, “What’s Your Warrior,” is aimed at Gen Z and focuses on non-traditional roles in the military, says ABC News’ Luis Martinez.

“It’s a new take for the Army because typically we’ve seen over the last couple of years they’ve been focusing on combat roles,” he tells the podcast. “They’re still going to be talking about that, but now they’re looking to see these non-traditional roles.”

PHOTO: Veterans Day, flags at a graveyard.
STOCK PHOTO/Getty Images

Veterans Day, flags at a graveyard.

“Start Here,” ABC News’ flagship podcast, offers a straightforward look at the day’s top stories in 20 minutes. Listen for free every weekday on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn or the ABC News app. Follow @StartHereABC on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for exclusive content and show updates.

Elsewhere:

‘Hateful messages’: A New York woman has been arrested for allegedly harassing a child with a genetic disorder, according to police.

‘Life has turned upside down’: An American father who lost his wife and two young sons in an ambush in Mexico last week spoke out for the first time in an exclusive interview with ABC News over the weekend, sharing his heartbreak and the difficult decision he’s just made to pull his family out of that country.

‘Executing a scheme’: Federal prosecutors have accused a Virginia doctor of performing surgeries on women — such as hysterectomies and removing their fallopian tubes without their consent according to court documents.

‘Experienced hiker’: A hiker who had gone missing while exploring a mountain in California was later found on top of a glacier, according to authorities.

From our friends at FiveThirtyEight:

‘How Seriously Should We Take Michael Bloomberg’s Potential 2020 Run?’: Bloomberg’s move is a big surprise given just how late it is in the electoral calendar. Now there are fewer than three months before the Iowa caucuses, and if Bloomberg does end up running, he’ll have to scramble to make the debate stage, let alone get himself in a position to win any states.

Doff your cap:

In the 2019-2020 season, between Los Angeles Opera, The Dallas Opera and the Metropolitan Opera, there are 53 conductor engagements. Of those 53 conductor appearances, five will be women.

That’s why Dallas Opera founded the Linda and Mitch Hart Institute for Women Conductors, a two-week residency for about a half dozen conductors and, now, administrators, which culminates in a concert attended by members of the public as well as officials, agents and managers.

PHOTO: French conductor Alexandra Cravero at the 2016 Hart Institute at The Dallas Opera.
Karen Almond, Dallas Opera

French conductor Alexandra Cravero at the 2016 Hart Institute at The Dallas Opera.

“Historically speaking, it’s a man on the podium leading an orchestra,” said Lisa Bury, Dallas Opera’s chief advancement and strategy officer. “There have been women, and very successful women, but the vast majority have been male, and in an era, i.e. the 21st century, it’s time as an industry to collectively improve the ratio and work together to achieve gender parity at the podium.”

“I have seen magical nights in the concerts of the Hart when you see women leading 80 people in the orchestra and the singers and just making our audience wild, and it was not because they were women. It was because they were incredible, capable leaders and musicians,” said David Lomeli, a Mexican tenor who is now the director of artistic administration at Dallas.

Doctor charged with performing hysterectomies without consent: Federal investigators

Federal prosecutors have accused a Virginia doctor of performing surgeries on women — such as hysterectomies and removing their fallopian tubes without their consent according to court documents.

Javaid Perwaiz, 69, faces several charges related to insurance fraud as a result of an investigation that began in September 2018 after the FBI received a tip from a hospital employee who suspected he was “performing unnecessary surgeries on unsuspecting patients,” according to the criminal complaint, filed Friday in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The unidentified patients would advise hospital staff that they were there for their “annual clean outs” and were not aware of the procedures they were undergoing, the affidavit states. In addition, hospital staff “had a difficult time” keeping up with the doctor “as he ran from procedure to procedure,” charging documents say.

Perwaiz has a practice in Chesapeake, where he lives, according to the court documents.

A preliminary review of Medicaid claims from his patients revealed that certain patients were subjected to repeated surgical procedures, with some occurring on an annual basis, the affidavit states. From January 2014 to August 2018, Perwaiz allegedly performed surgery on 40% of his Medicaid beneficiaries, which amounted to 510 patients. About 42% of those patients underwent two or more surgeries, according to the court documents.

PHOTO: The office of Dr. Javaid Perwaiz in Chesapeake, Va.
Google Map Street View

The office of Dr. Javaid Perwaiz in Chesapeake, Va.

The review also revealed that Perwaiz allegedly had a “propensity to conduct bundled surgeries,” involving laparoscopy, dilation and curettage, and lysis of adhesions, the affidavit states.

On one patient, Perwaiz allegedly performed annual D and C surgeries based on a diagnosis of endometriosis, according to the court documents. On at least one occasion, she was scheduled for the procedure without having appeared for an office visit, and in 2011, Perwaiz allegedly treated her for an ectopic pregnancy.

From 2011 to 2014, Perwaiz allegedly asked the patiently “routinely” whether she planned on having another baby, the affidavit states. In 2014, when the patient sought treatment from a fertility specialist, that doctor advised her that “both fallopian tubes were burnt down to nubs, making natural conception impossible.”

The court documents alleges that Perwaiz removed that patient’s fallopian tubes without her consent or knowledge.

In another case, in 2012, federal prosecutors say the patient thought only her ovaries would be removed but was “shocked” when she awoke from surgery to discover that Perwaiz allegedly performed a full hysterectomy, which he documented as an “elective surgery”on her medical record. That patient learned that there were less invasive procedures available when consulting with another doctor, according to the court documents.

The last surgery listed in the court documents occurred on Oct. 19 of this year, in which Perwaiz allegedly performed an abdominal supracervical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and lysis of adhesions on a patient who later told investigators that she “never made complaints” regarding pelvic pain, pelvic pressure or constant cramping, despite what was written in her medical chart on Sept. 30. The patient also stated that she told the doctor she did not want a hysterectomy, but he allegedly told her it was the “best option” and did not discuss other treatment options or the risk of surgery.

Perwaiz’s medical practice submitted three claims to Blue Cross Blue Shield for that patient on Oct. 28 and was later reimbursed $942.22 for the partial hysterectomy, according to the affidavit.

PHOTO: Javaid Perwaiz in a police booking photo.
Western Tidewater Regional Jail

Javaid Perwaiz in a police booking photo.

Federal prosecutors have charged Perwaiz with “executing a scheme” to defraud the Virginia Medical Assistance Program and Blue Cross Blue Shield by submitting false and fictitious claims from 2010 to about October of this year, according to the court documents. He is also be charged with making false and fictitious claims to Blue Cross Blue Shield for the patient he treated in October for providing her with medical care that “did not present with the symptoms listed” and that she did not need.

Perwaiz was arrested Friday and was still being held at the Western Tidewater Regional Jail in Suffolk, Virginia, as of Sunday. His attorney, Lawrence H. Woodward Jr., did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

The affadavist lists other instances in where Perwaiz was under investigation related to his medical practice. In 1982, Perwaiz lost his hospital privileges at the Bon Secours Maryview Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia, “due to poor clinical judgment and for performing unnecessary surgeries” and had been invested by the Virginia Board of Medicine for performing surgeries, predominately hysterectomies, “without appropriate medical indications and contrary to sound judgment.”

Perwaiz was ultimately censured for poor record keeping, according to the court documents.

In 1996, Perwaiz pleaded guilty to two counts of tax evasion, and his medical license was temporarily revoked but later reinstated in 1998, the affidavit states. He has also been the subject of at least eight medical malpractice lawsuits, charging documents state, in which plaintiffs allege he “falsified patient records to justify a medical procedure, failed to use less invasive techniques, performed as many as 30 surgeries in one day, and provided substandard care that resulted in irreparable permanent injuries to three patients and life threatening injuries to another two patients.”

He was still wearing green scrubs when he made his initial appearance at the U.S. District Court in Norfolk, where he was ordered to be held without bond, according to the newspaper.

Bernard Tyson, trailblazing Kaiser Permanente CEO, dies at 60

Bernard J. Tyson, chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente, died in his sleep on Sunday, the company confirmed to ABC News in a statement. He was 60.

“An outstanding leader, visionary and champion for high-quality, affordable health care for all Americans, Bernard was a tireless advocate for Kaiser Permanente, our members and the communities we serve. Most importantly, Bernard was a devoted husband, father and friend. We all will miss his tremendous presence in our lives,” the company said in a statement.

Gregory A. Adams, executive vice president and group president, was named interim chairman and CEO, effective immediately, the company said.

Tyson was regarded as a trailblazer by many as one of the few African American CEOs of a massive U.S. company.

FILE PHOTO: Bernard Tyson, CEO of Kaiser Permanente, participates in a panel discussion at the 2015 Fortune Global Forum in San Francisco on Nov. 3, 2015. He died on Sunday, Nov. 10, 2019.
Elijah Nouvelage/Reuters

FILE Bernard Tyson, CEO of Kaiser Permanente, participates in a panel discussion at the 2015 Fortune Global Forum in San Francisco on Nov. 3, 2015. He died on Sunday, Nov. 10, 2019.

Although not a Fortune 500 company because Kaiser Permanente is a not-for-profit organization, the company’s operating revenue would place it at No. 42 on the Fortune 500, Fortune magazine reported in 2017.

There are currently only four black CEOs at Fortune 500 companies, Black Enterprise reported.

Tyson appeared on Time’s list of the world’s most influential people and other lists including Modern Healthcare’s list of influential people in the industry.

In addition to his role at Kaiser Permanente, Tyson served on several corporate boards, including those for the American Heart Association and the tech firm Salesforce.

PHOTO: Kaiser Permanente Chairman & CEO Bernard J. Tyson and Arianna Huffington, founder & CEO of Thrive Global and The Huffington Post, arrive at the TIME 100 Health Summit at Pier 17 on Oct. 17, 2019 in New York City.
Craig Barritt/Getty Images for TIME 100 Health

Kaiser Permanente Chairman & CEO Bernard J. Tyson and Arianna Huffington, founder & CEO of Thrive Global and The Huffington Post, arrive at the TIME 100 Health Summit at Pier 17 on Oct. 17, 2019 in New York City.

According to a biography provided by Kaiser, Tyson was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, served as deputy chairman of the Americas of the International Federation of Health Plans and was the former chair of American Health Insurance Plans.

A native of the San Francisco Bay Area, Tyson earned a Master of Business Administration in health service administration and a bachelor’s degree in health service management.

Missing hiker found dead atop glacier on mountain

A hiker who had gone missing while exploring a mountain in California was later found on top of a glacier, according to authorities.

Alan Stringer, 40, of Huntington Beach, failed to return home on Monday after setting off on Nov. 3 to hike in the area near Bishop, California, about 300 miles north, according to the Inyo County Sheriff’s Office.

Stringer, who was described as an “experienced hiker” had not disclosed the details of his hiking plans or the routes he planned to take, but rescue crews used information that he had recently purchased an ice ax and crampons and participated in mountaineering training courses to narrow down the search, authorities said.

Sheriff’s deputies located Stringer’s vehicle at North Lake early Tuesday morning and crews began searching for him aerially in the area, according to the sheriff’s office.

A forensic analysis of Stringer’s cell phone activity revealed only one call very early Sunday in the Bishop area, before his planned hike. He was only equipped with gear for hiking during the day and had an InReach satellite communication device, but he never activated it, according to the sheriff’s office.

PHOTO: Mt Darwin in California.
STOCK PHOTO/Getty Images

Mt Darwin in California.

After more aerial searches on Wednesday, Stringer was found dead by workers of the Sequoia and Kings National Park on Thursday afternoon at the top of the Darwin glacier, near the base of the notch to go up Mount Darwin, authorities said.

Further information regarding Stringer’s death was not immediately available. The Sequoia and Kings National Park is conducting the investigation and the recovery of his body, according to the sheriff’s office.

Father of black woman killed by white Texas officer while inside her home dies

Marquis Jefferson, father of Atatiana Jefferson, a black woman fatally shot by a white police officer inside her Fort Worth, Texas, home last month, has died.

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Family spokesperson, Bruce Carter, said that Jefferson suffered a heart attack and died around 6:30 p.m. Saturday night at the Methodist Charlton Medical Center in Dallas. He was 59-years-old.

Carter told KDFW that Jefferson had been battling chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and was under a lot of stress in the few weeks since his daughter’s death.

“He ultimately just succumbed to, I don’t know, I can only say a broken heart,” Carter said. “He just never recovered from the grieving process.”

FILE - The father of Atatiana Jefferson suffered a heart attack and died Saturday, Nov. 9, 2019, at a Dallas hospital. (Jeffersons family via AP, File)
AP

FILE – The father of Atatiana Jefferson suffered a heart attack and died Saturday, Nov. 9, 2019, at a Dallas hospital. (Jefferson’s family via AP, File)

Atatiana Jefferson, 28, was Marquis Jefferson’s only child.

She was killed on Oct. 12 while playing video games with her 8-year-old nephew. Fort Worth officer Aaron Dean, 34, fired fatally into her bedroom window while conducting a wellness check.

— ABC News (@ABC) October 14, 2019

At a press conference last month, Fort Worth Police Lt. Brandon O’Neil said Dean never identified himself as police, sparking national outrage and claims of excessive policing. Body camera footage released by the Fort Worth Police Department also appears to confirm that Dean did not identify himself as police before he shot.
Dean resigned before he could be fired in connection with the shooting. He was released on a $200,000 bond after he was arrested and charged with murder.

PHOTO: DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 24: A mourner pays respects before the start of the funeral service for Atatiana Jefferson on October 24, 2019, at Concord Church in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Stewart F. House/Getty Images)
Stewart F. House/Getty Images

DALLAS, TX – OCTOBER 24: A mourner pays respects before the start of the funeral service for Atatiana Jefferson on October 24, 2019, at Concord Church in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Stewart F. House/Getty Images)

Marquis Jefferson made headlines in the weeks following his daughter’s death as he sought a temporary restraining order to gain control over her funeral arrangements from his daughter’s aunt. He said that he had been denied any involvement in the funeral planning and as his daughter’s sole legal heir, it was his duty to arrange it. A deal was eventually reached, and the funeral service took place Oct. 24.

Sacramento Kings star Harrison Barnes and Philadelphia Eagles defensive tackle Malik Jackson helped cover the funeral costs for Atatiana, according to Jefferson family attorney Lee Meritt.

Nearly three weeks after laying Atatiana to rest, the Jefferson family is faced with another funeral.

“Please keep his family in your prayers,” Carter said in a statement, “and tonight make sure you hug and tell your loved ones how much you love them.”

Despite smaller footprint, military objective remains the same in Syria: Gen. Milley

Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said that although the military’s footprint will remain small, it’s important to keep watch over the Islamic State in Syria to meet the objective of permanently defeating ISIS.

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“There are still ISIS fighters in the region. And unless pressure is maintained, unless attention is maintained on that group, then there is a very real possibility that conditions could be set for a reemergence of ISIS,” the new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week,” in his first interview since taking the role. “The footprint will be small, but the objective will remain the same: the enduring defeat of ISIS.”

Asked about current troop levels in Syria after President Trump’s recent call to withdraw forces, Milley said over 500 troops would likely remain there.

“If I do my math and I look at the new troops going in and those going out, it could be more than 700 who remain,” said “This Week” co-anchor Martha Raddatz.

Milley responded, “Well, there’ll be less than a thousand for sure, and probably in the 500-ish frame, maybe six. But it’s in, that it’s in, that area. But we’re not gonna go into specific numbers because we’re still going through the analysis right now.”

President Donald Trump announced plans to withdraw nearly all American troops in the Kurdish-controlled region in Syria in October, drawing bipartisan backlash in Congress.

His stance on troop deployments reversed only two days after the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, when the president said military forces “may have to fight for the oil.”

PHOTO: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley and This Week Co-anchor Martha Raddatz during their interview on This Week.
ABC News

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley and “This Week” Co-anchor Martha Raddatz during their interview on “This Week.”

The death of ISIS leader al-Baghdadi also raised concerns over a new potential leader of ISIS, but Milley said the Pentagon has “a considerable amount of information” on that individual.

“We’ll see in the days ahead, in the weeks ahead, in the months ahead if he’s able to piece together his organization or not,” Milley said on “This Week” Sunday. “We’ll pay close attention to him and where opportunities arise, we’ll go after him as well.”

As the impeachment inquiry intensifies, Milley also underlined the diplomatic significance of military aid to Ukraine, saying that it’s important to continue to help Ukraine maintain its free and sovereign status.

Milley declined to comment on the recent news surrounding National Security Council official Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who testified in a closed door deposition in the impeachment inquiry and was attacked by President Trump.

“I have learned over the years an active duty military officer is not to comment on active investigations,” he said, adding that doing so would be inappropriate.

Milley also discussed U.S. military efforts in Afghanistan, which he insisted never again would be “a safe haven to terrorists that would attack the United States.”

“In order for that mission to be successful, the government of Afghanistan, the Afghan security forces, are going to have to be able to sustain their own internal security to prevent terrorists from using their territory to attack other countries, especially the United States,” Milley said. “That effort’s ongoing. It’s been ongoing for 18 consecutive years.”

After serving in Afghanistan as the Deputy Commanding General, Milley told ABC News he has never once regretted his decision to join the military. Born and raised in a veterans’ family, he said he thinks about the soldiers who died under his command as Veterans’ Day approaches.

“The freedoms we have are not free. They’re paid for in the blood of all those soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines have been fighting for it for two and a half centuries,” he said.

Arctic blast on way will likely challenge hundreds of records this week

Saturday was the end of the latest cold blast across much of the eastern U.S., however a more intense, much colder, record breaking cold blast that will impact more than half of the U.S. is on the way.

PHOTO: Saturday was the end of the latest cold blast across much of the eastern U.S., however a more intense, much colder, record breaking cold blast that will impact more than half of the U.S. is on the way.
ABC News

Saturday was the end of the latest cold blast across much of the eastern U.S., however a more intense, much colder, record breaking cold blast that will impact more than half of the U.S. is on the way.

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A very cold air mass straight form the Arctic is currently en route to the central and eastern U.S. While the cold will begin to spill into parts of the central U.S. Sunday and Monday, the core of the cold will hit on Tuesday and Wednesday for the eastern two-thirds of the nation.

This air mass is notable for November, with temperatures likely to be 20 to 30 degrees below average. Confidence is growing that likely hundreds of records will be broken on Tuesday and Wednesday, from Texas to Maine. This includes both daily record minimum temperatures and daily record minimum high temperatures. Also to note, that many of these records that are in danger this week are from the 1800’s.

On Tuesday, nearly the entire Central U.S. will see wind chills in the teens and single digits. In the upper Midwest, wind chills will be below zero in spots. Then on Wednesday, this cold air will expand into the northeast where it will be just absolutely brutal for November standards with wind chills in the low teens and single digits for the entire Northeast U.S.

PHOTO: On Tuesday, nearly the entire Central U.S., will see wind chills in the teens, single digits. In the upper Midwest, wind chills will be below zero in spots.
ABC News

On Tuesday, nearly the entire Central U.S., will see wind chills in the teens, single digits. In the upper Midwest, wind chills will be below zero in spots.

This Arctic air lurks behind a couple of different weather systems that are sort of interacting with each other over the next couple days. Already, new winter storm alerts are being issued for parts of the U.S. this morning for a little bit of snow that will come with this blast of Arctic air.

Near the Great lakes today, some Lake Effect snow will be possible, with possible light accumulations. However, a storm system will surge southward into the central U.S. today, with snow overspreading the northern Rockies.

PHOTO: A storm system will surge southward into the central U.S. today, with snow overspreading the northern Rockies.
ABC News

A storm system will surge southward into the central U.S. today, with snow overspreading the northern Rockies.

Some snow will develop late Sunday into Early Monday and stretch from Colorado all the way to Michigan. Snow likely gets into some major cities like Des Moines, Chicago and Milwaukee. Snow on Monday morning could cause slippery travel in the Chicago area on Monday morning.

Then on Monday night, likely a wide swath of snow will stretch from Arkansas to Maine, with the heaviest into parts of Ohio, Kentucky, and Western New York.

PHOTO: A wide swath of snow will stretch from Arkansas to Maine, with the heaviest into parts of Ohio, Kentucky, and Western New York.
ABC News

A wide swath of snow will stretch from Arkansas to Maine, with the heaviest into parts of Ohio, Kentucky, and Western New York.

Then on Tuesday as the storm hits the east coast, likely rain will be changing to snow due to the Arctic air quickly moving in.

The result of this is some snow from the Midwest to the East Coast. Only light accumulations, if any, are expected in the big Northeast cities from Philadelphia to Boston. Chicago and Milwaukee could also pick up a couple of inches. However, the bullseye for snow will be from northern Indiana to northern Vermont, especially in areas prone to lake effect enhanced snow. Locally 3 to 6 or more inches of snow will be possible through Wednesday.

Elsewhere, a small brush fire broke out on Saturday in the Hollywood Hills. The Fire named the Barham fire spread to 34 acres and was quickly brought up to 15% containment.

Thankfully, the fire did not really erupt because there is no significant wind. It is just the normal dry season in Los Angeles.

However, the fire burned near Hollywood Studio lots and caused some dramatic scenes of fire and smoke near iconic parts of Hollywood.

There will be some elevated concerns of Fire Danger in the Los Angeles area on Monday into early Tuesday, however, the forecast is not nearly as ominous as just a few weeks ago.

As income inequality soars, languishing labor unions make a return

After decades of declining membership and seemingly sidelined authority, a series of national strikes has put unions back in the spotlight. And as economic inequality has become a hot-button issue for workers and candidates on the 2020 campaign trail, some experts have said a surge of emboldened organized labor movements could be on the horizon.

Once considered by many to be essential, union membership is a fraction of what it once was: Approximately 10% of U.S. workers were part of a union in 2018, according to the most recent data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. In 1983, the first year the department collected data, the number was more than twice that — over 20%.

PHOTO: Striking union auto workers walk the picket line outside the General Motors Flint Truck Assembly in Flint, Mich., Oct. 9, 2019.
Brian Snyder/Reuters, FILE

Striking union auto workers walk the picket line outside the General Motors Flint Truck Assembly in Flint, Mich., Oct. 9, 2019.

“We’ve had massive union decline — back in the ’40s, over 30% of workers were unionized in this country,” Sylvia Allegretto, a labor economist and the co-chair of the University of California, Berkeley’s Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics, told ABC News.

While union members account for only a fraction of the workforce, recent actions have forced them back in the public eye.

Last month, the United Auto Workers completed the longest auto industry strike in 50 years at General Motors, and ended it with $11,000 bonuses, higher wages and clearer paths to full-time status for temporary workers.

Similarly, last month, the Chicago Teachers’ Union organized a 15-day strike that ended with pay raises and a pledge to reduce class sizes.

PHOTO: Union Membership
ABC NEWS

Union Membership

Presidential candidates, including Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden, joined strikers on the picket lines, and a slew of politicians expressed support on social media.

In the wake of these two highly publicized strikes, the Association of Flight Attendants announced this month that it’s organizing an effort to unionize Delta flight attendants for the first time.

“Union organizers I’ve talked to have said that there is a dramatic pick-up in the number of people interested in organizing and trying to gain collective bargaining,” Larry Mishel, a labor expert and distinguished fellow at the Economic Policy Institute, told ABC News.

“Working people have taken it on the chin for many decades. They’ve been not able to get the help of government to be on their sides, the employers are suppressing their wages,” he added. “And now they are being shown that some collective action can actually work.”

“If people see that they can solve their problems through collective bargaining — and even striking if they have to — then they will do that,” Mishel said. “And I think that’s what we’re seeing.”

‘The economy is booming … but my paycheck has gone nowhere’

The ratio between the highest- and lowest-paid Walmart employee is more than 1,000-to-1. Many other U.S. corporations have pay ratios exceeding 500 to 1. Teachers and other full-time workers often cannot afford housing in major U.S. cities despite strong economic indicators.

Unions may be seeing a revival due to “the rise of economic inequality in the country,” according to Joseph Kane, a senior research associate and associate fellow at the Brookings Institute’s Metropolitan Policy Program.

The top 1% of the U.S. holds more wealth than the entire middle class, according to the Brookings Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank.

It wasn’t always this way: Prior to 2010, the middle class owned more wealth than the top 1%. Since the mid-90’s, however, the share of wealth held by the top 1% has steadily increased, while the share held by the middle class has steadily declined, according to Brookings.

“Not all people are sharing in the economic gains that we are seeing,” Kane said. “That’s led to some very real frustrations and curiosity, I think, of, ‘Well, what can unions do about this?'”

PHOTO: Mary Barra, Chairman and CEO of General Motors Co. and Gary Jones, president of the United Auto Workers, shake hands during a GM event at the Renaissance Center in Detroit, July 16, 2019.
Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE

Mary Barra, Chairman and CEO of General Motors Co. and Gary Jones, president of the United Auto Workers, shake hands during a GM event at the Renaissance Center in Detroit, July 16, 2019.

While many unions probably would agree that strikes are a “last-resort” option, Kane said these high-profile strikes are “magnifying some of these broader interests in what unions and organized labor can do to help people.”

Allegretto added that some of the recent teacher strikes happened at a “time when economic growth was happening for quite a while” in the decade following the 2008 recession, and “most of the states had already fulfilled their budget shortfall, but what a lot of them didn’t do was replace the money that they took away from the public education.”

“One part of the story is why the teachers said enough is enough,” she added. “In Oklahoma, those teachers did not have a raise in over two decades. I think that’s kind of what we’re seeing now.

“I think workers are really saying, ‘What are we supposed to do here? The economy is booming, the economic pie has grown considerably, but my paycheck has gone nowhere.'”

It certainly helps workers who might face discrimination in the work place get a better deal.

While union membership has declined across the board, it has dropped the slowest among black workers, who remained more likely to be union members than any other race in 2018, according to BLS data.

Union Membership rates
ABC NEWS

Union Membership rates

“We know that unions tend to raise wages for those who have the least wages, so they tend to disproportionately help minorities,” Mishel said of the statistics. “So Hispanics and blacks are very favorable in union organizing drives, and we see women growing more than among men in various sectors.”

Allegretto added that because unions bargain collectively, everybody “under the collective bargaining agreement is getting the same deal, so it certainly helps workers who might face discrimination in the work place get a better deal.”

So why the massive decline in union membership?

Employer resistance, especially in the private sector, and changing labor laws have a “big role to play” in the decline of union membership, Kane said.

Mishel added, “There’s an easy tale to tell that’s actually wrong: That somehow the union decline is all due to automation and globalization.”

“But,” he added, “union density has fallen even in construction, communication, supermarkets, just across the board.”

PHOTO: Chicago Public Schools teachers and supporters rally outside City Hall in Chicago on Friday, Oct. 18, 2019.
Scott Heins/The New York Times/Redux, FILE

Chicago Public Schools teachers and supporters rally outside City Hall in Chicago on Friday, Oct. 18, 2019.

He added that “employer opposition has been severe” and organized labor “imploded” in the late ’70s and ’80s.

“It’s primarily declining in the private sector, and, really, the main one of the leading reasons is that employers’ actions in the 1970s and some changes in the law really made it extraordinarily difficult for workers to become organized,” Mishel said. “If you get fired for trying to get a union where you work, it’s illegal to get fired for that, but what happens? Well, it takes five or seven years, and maybe you will get your job back.”

PHOTO: Braving snow and cold temperatures, thousands marched through the streets near City Hall during the 11th day of an ongoing teachers strike on Oct. 31, 2019 in Chicago.
Scott Heins/Getty Images

Braving snow and cold temperatures, thousands marched through the streets near City Hall during the 11th day of an ongoing teachers strike on Oct. 31, 2019 in Chicago.

Allegretto said that it has become nearly “impossible to form new unions in the United States.”

The erosion of unions leads to not only lower wages and benefits for workers but “hurts our democracy,” according to Mishel. “It doesn’t allow our workers to be represented in the political process the way they used to be.”

Despite the difficulties in organizing, Allegretto said that especially at a time like now, many workers are looking to stronger labor unions redress glaring economic imbalances.

“We do know that the stagnating wages, that inequality has grown so much,” Allegretto said. “A very large share of that inequality has to do with the decline of unions and the decline of union power.”